Barna Lab

Barna Lab

The Barna Lab seeks to address how the living blueprints of developing organisms are built.

barnalab.stanford.edu

Beachy Lab

Beachy Lab

The Beachy lab studies the function of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation) and in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

people.stanford.edu/pbeachy

Bejarano Lab

Bejarano Lab

The Bejerano Lab focuses on a fundamental question in Human Genomics: the relationship between geno(me)type and phenotype.  Join us

bejerano.stanford.edu

Boettiger Lab

Boettiger Lab

We seek to understand the control of gene expression. 

A major direction in the lab is to understand how such long-range interactions occur, how they achieve target specificity, and how they may be reprogrammed by alterations to the genome sequence.

alistairboettiger.info

Chen Lab

Chen Lab

Research:

Small-molecule modulators of the Hedgehog pathway

chen.stanford.edu

Crabtree Lab

Crabtree Lab

Jarosz Lab

Jarosz Lab

Our aim is to identify and characterize systems that influence the interplay among genetic variation, phenotypic diversity, and environmental fluctuations at the molecular level, integrating our findings to gain insight into complex cellular systems.

jarosz.stanford.edu

Seung Kim Lab

Seung Kim Lab

Our goal is to identify and understand the pathways that govern organogenesis of the pancreas, a vital organ with endocrine and exocrine functions.

seungkimlab.stanford.edu

Kingsley Lab

Kingsley Lab

Research Interests:
The Molecular Basis of Vertebrate Evolution.

kingsley.stanford.edu

Nusse Lab

Nusse Lab

Our laboratory is interested in the growth, development and integrity of animal tissues. We study multiple different organs, trying to identify common principles, and we extend these investigations to cancer and injury repair.

nusselab.stanford.edu

shapirolab.jpg
Talbot Lab

Talbot Lab

Our research focuses on the development and function of glial cells in the vertebrate nervous system.  Using genetic screens and cellular approaches in zebrafish, we aim to discover new genes with essential functions in glial cells, define new animal models of important disorders in humans, and provide new avenues toward therapies for injury and disease of the nervous system.

talbotlab.stanford.edu

Villeneuve Lab

Villeneuve Lab

Research in the Villeneuve lab is aimed at understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the faithful inheritance and function of eukaryotic chromosomes. Our primary focus is on elucidating the events required for the orderly segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis, the crucial process by which diploid germ cells generate haploid gametes.

villeneuve.stanford.edu

Wang Lab

Wang Lab

We are a discovery-driven research group working at the interface between developmental biology, bioengineering, and statistical physics. We combine quantitative organism-wide fluorescence imaging ("deep imaging"), functional genomics ("deep sequencing"), and statistical modeling to understand the fundamental rules that control collective cell behaviors to optimize tissue organization, regeneration, adaptation, and evolution.  We also seek opportunities for applying these rules to improve engineering systems.

wanglab.stanford.edu